Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Suche
Breadcrumb Navigation

Project Details

Hauptinhalt der Seite
idTitel_deuTitel_engProjekt_StartProjekt_EndeProjektstatusProjektstatus_enZALF_InstituteZALF_Institute_enIdxiZALF_PersonenIdxpLabelDetailsHomepageStartjahrSuchfeldZielsetzung_deuZielsetzung_engZALF_Institute_htmlZALF_Istitute_ENG_htmlZALF_Personen_htmlProjektleiterProjekt_Leiter_htmlProgrammbereich_htmlProgrammbereich_eng_htmlIdx_ProgrambereichProjektpartner_htmlIdx_ProjektpartnerFoerderer_htmlSchlagworteProjekttraegerProjekttraeger_htmlProjektmitarbeiter_extern_htmlProjektstatus_SortProjektstatus_en_SortAnlagenBereiche_ZALF_deBereiche_ZALF_en
2137Protein Paradoxes - Scenarios for legume protein in European agricultural systemsProtein Paradoxes - Scenarios for legume protein in European agricultural systems01/01/2020 00:00:0031/10/2020 00:00:00abgeschlossencompletedLeibniz-Zentrum für Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF) e. V.Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)x0x16x18xBachinger, Johann; Reckling, Moritz; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea; Notz, Inka; Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Omari, Richard Ansongx190x1364x1853x2473x2478x2528x<div class='ntm_ZAL'>ZAL</div> <a href="https://www.leibniz-lebensmittel-und-ernaehrung.de/en/projects/protein-paradoxes/scenarios-for-legume-protein-in-european-agricultural-systems.html">https://www.leibniz-lebensmittel-und-ernaehrung.de/en/projects/protein-paradoxes/scenarios-for-legume-protein-in-european-agricultural-systems.html</a><BR />2020 Protein Paradoxes - Scenarios for legume protein in European agricultural systems Protein Paradoxes - Scenarios for legume protein in European agricultural systems Leibniz-Zentrum für Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF) e. V. Bachinger, Johann; Reckling, Moritz; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea; Notz, Inka; Mouratiadou, Ioanna; Omari, Richard Ansong Drittmittel Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) completed abgeschlossen <div class="ExternalClassC32BDE6AC5914449B440B0645D3B823D"><p>This workshop is part of the <span><span>'Protein Paradoxes' </span></span>project of the Leibniz Association and is organised by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF).</p><p>European Union devotes only 3% of its arable land to protein crops and imports more than 75% of its vegetable protein supply, mainly from Brazil, Argentina and the United States (European Parliament 2018). Changes in international trade and diets affect global protein markets, environmental quality and biodiversity conservation, and the management of agricultural systems. Diversified crop management could help farmers adapt to social, economic and environmental changes and mitigate the impact of climate change. Grain legumes e.g. pea, faba bean, lupin, soybean and other legumes are used for a wide range of food and feed products and support the needed crop diversification. Diversification with grain legumes could reduce fertilizer and pesticide use and increase domestic plant protein production and consumption in Europe. Besides, legumes could improve the resilience of European farming systems to the socio-economic and climatic variability, enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services, and contribute to novel food systems.</p><p>The workshop aims to develop a set of novel future scenarios for better-utilizing grain legumes with a focus on food systems in Europe by addressing the following questions&#58;</p><ul><li><span><span>What is the impact of changed consumption patterns on grain legume production?</span></span></li><li>How does climate change affect future protein supply?</li><li>How does global protein demand change resulting from continuous population growth?</li></ul></div> <div class="ExternalClassA8D6F74A24C24FC0A024ED730D4F8A30"><p><span><span>This workshop is part of the <span><span>'Protein Paradoxes' </span></span>project of the Leibniz Association and is organised by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF).</span></span></p><p>European Union devotes only 3% of its arable land to protein crops and imports more than 75% of its vegetable protein supply, mainly from Brazil, Argentina and the United States (European Parliament 2018). Changes in international trade and diets affect global protein markets, environmental quality and biodiversity conservation, and the management of agricultural systems. Diversified crop management could help farmers adapt to social, economic and environmental changes and mitigate the impact of climate change. Grain legumes e.g. pea, faba bean, lupin, soybean and other legumes are used for a wide range of food and feed products and support the needed crop diversification. Diversification with grain legumes could reduce fertilizer and pesticide use and increase domestic plant protein production and consumption in Europe. Besides, legumes could improve the resilience of European farming systems to the socio-economic and climatic variability, enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services, and contribute to novel food systems.</p><p>The workshop aims to develop a set of novel future scenarios for better-utilizing grain legumes with a focus on food systems in Europe by addressing the following questions&#58;</p><ul><li>What is the impact of changed consumption patterns on grain legume production?</li><li>How does climate change affect future protein supply?</li><li>How does global protein demand change resulting from continuous population growth?</li></ul></div> <div class="ExternalClass51A72379-57DE-4231-AD0F-0AD1C5705238"></div> <div class="ExternalClass7940AAEC-9F26-44DD-A700-D9CD9E11AFCD"><ul><li>Agricultural University Vienna</li><li>DIfE - Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke </li><li>PIK Institut für Klimafolgenforschung e.V. Potsdam</li><li>SRUC - Scotland Rural University College</li><li>University of Helsinki</li><li>Vrije University Amsterdam</li></ul></div> <div class="ExternalClass54BED3A2-DDDC-4929-8ED1-23BA33D7D79D"></div> <div class="ExternalClass5BC63260-5DAF-47C2-A2B2-7B0DF9626CE8"></div> <div class="ExternalClassE9E219A1-13A0-49CC-86F3-29A5B3D25677"></div><div class="ExternalClassC32BDE6AC5914449B440B0645D3B823D"><p>This workshop is part of the <span><span>'Protein Paradoxes' </span></span>project of the Leibniz Association and is organised by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF).</p><p>European Union devotes only 3% of its arable land to protein crops and imports more than 75% of its vegetable protein supply, mainly from Brazil, Argentina and the United States (European Parliament 2018). Changes in international trade and diets affect global protein markets, environmental quality and biodiversity conservation, and the management of agricultural systems. Diversified crop management could help farmers adapt to social, economic and environmental changes and mitigate the impact of climate change. Grain legumes e.g. pea, faba bean, lupin, soybean and other legumes are used for a wide range of food and feed products and support the needed crop diversification. Diversification with grain legumes could reduce fertilizer and pesticide use and increase domestic plant protein production and consumption in Europe. Besides, legumes could improve the resilience of European farming systems to the socio-economic and climatic variability, enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services, and contribute to novel food systems.</p><p>The workshop aims to develop a set of novel future scenarios for better-utilizing grain legumes with a focus on food systems in Europe by addressing the following questions&#58;</p><ul><li><span><span>What is the impact of changed consumption patterns on grain legume production?</span></span></li><li>How does climate change affect future protein supply?</li><li>How does global protein demand change resulting from continuous population growth?</li></ul></div><div class="ExternalClassA8D6F74A24C24FC0A024ED730D4F8A30"><p><span><span>This workshop is part of the <span><span>'Protein Paradoxes' </span></span>project of the Leibniz Association and is organised by the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF).</span></span></p><p>European Union devotes only 3% of its arable land to protein crops and imports more than 75% of its vegetable protein supply, mainly from Brazil, Argentina and the United States (European Parliament 2018). Changes in international trade and diets affect global protein markets, environmental quality and biodiversity conservation, and the management of agricultural systems. Diversified crop management could help farmers adapt to social, economic and environmental changes and mitigate the impact of climate change. Grain legumes e.g. pea, faba bean, lupin, soybean and other legumes are used for a wide range of food and feed products and support the needed crop diversification. Diversification with grain legumes could reduce fertilizer and pesticide use and increase domestic plant protein production and consumption in Europe. Besides, legumes could improve the resilience of European farming systems to the socio-economic and climatic variability, enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services, and contribute to novel food systems.</p><p>The workshop aims to develop a set of novel future scenarios for better-utilizing grain legumes with a focus on food systems in Europe by addressing the following questions&#58;</p><ul><li>What is the impact of changed consumption patterns on grain legume production?</li><li>How does climate change affect future protein supply?</li><li>How does global protein demand change resulting from continuous population growth?</li></ul></div>  <div class="ExternalClassB5FEDC43-4459-4A70-BB73-165FB54A1B2E">Dr. agr. Johann Bachinger; Prof. Dr. Sonoko Dorothea Bellingrath-Kimura; Dr. phil. Ioanna Mouratiadou; Inka Notz; Dr. phil. Richard Ansong Omari; Dr. agr. Moritz Reckling</div>Bachinger, Johann;Reckling, Moritz<div class="ExternalClass01F8E77F-2C3D-4796-A459-27EEEBEE084E">Dr. agr. Johann Bachinger; Dr. agr. Moritz Reckling</a></div>   <div class="ExternalClass7940AAEC-9F26-44DD-A700-D9CD9E11AFCD"><ul><li>Agricultural University Vienna</li><li>DIfE - Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke </li><li>PIK Institut für Klimafolgenforschung e.V. Potsdam</li><li>SRUC - Scotland Rural University College</li><li>University of Helsinki</li><li>Vrije University Amsterdam</li></ul></div>x134x2543x4x1877x1016x678x     33 <div class="ExternalClass65C683B4-57D6-4C08-9613-FB3AF41C623E"><ul><li>Ressourceneffiziente Anbausysteme</li><li>Bereitstellung von Ökosystemleistungen in Agrarsystemen</li></ul></div><div class="ExternalClass2741353E-992C-4F1B-BD48-6E81C8695655"><ul><li>Resource-Efficient Cropping Systems</li><li>Provisioning of Ecosystem Services in Agricultural Systems</li></ul></div>
Fusszeile der Seite
Wordpress
YouTube
Twitter
Facebook
© Leibniz-Zentrum für Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF) e. V. Müncheberg